• The World Today

    India: Tharoor praised for saying Britain must pay

    At a time of sharp polarization in Indian politics, the diplomat and politician Shashi Tharoor has come close to uniting the country with a call for Britain to pay reparations for two centuries of colonial rule. 

    ‘Britain’s rise for 200 years was financed by its depredations in India,’ Tharoor said during a debate at the Oxford Union in support of the motion, ‘This house believes Britain owes reparations to her former colonies’. 

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  • The World Today

    NATO needs feet on the ground to curb Russian ambitions in the Baltic States

    After Ukraine, there is a pessimistic view of the alliance’s capacity to protect Latvia and its neighbours from the Kremlin's probing

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    Geoffrey Pridham is Emeritus Professor and Senior Research Fellow in Politics at Bristol University. He lives for part of the year in Latvia

  • The World Today

    From the editor

    Four years ago, when Hosni Mubarak was forced out of office by a ‘Facebook revolution’, it seemed social media spelt the end of authoritarian governments. In our cover story we look at the mechanisms – some bullying, some more subtle – which governments use to maintain control of the media in the chaos of the digital age. 

    712Alan Philps
  • The World Today

    Jargonbuster: An unwanted legacy

    One of the strangest legacies of the 2012 Olympics was the turning of the word ‘legacy’ into an adjective. Part of the pitch for London to host the Games was that it would leave a legacy of urban regeneration in east London and something called the Legacy Corporation was set up to deliver it. 

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  • The World Today

    Diplomacy: The academy training Britain’s future envoys

    The Foreign Office has to do more with a reduced budget. In the race to be the world's most effective diplomatic service, will it always be second to France?

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    Michael Binyon is a former diplomatic editor of The Times

  • The World Today

    Report sets rules for UN blue helmet missions

    The United Nation’s peacekeeping operations are in deep trouble after 15 years in which the number of its blue helmets deployed has risen from 20,000 to 120,000.

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    Jean-Marie Guéhenno, President & CEO of International Crisis Group, was chief of UN peacekeeping 2000-8 and is the author of ‘The Fog of Peace, a Memoir of International Peacekeeping in the 21st Century’ (Brookings Press)

  • Photo: DigitalGlobe/ScapeWare3d/Contributor/Getty Images.Research paper

    Maritime Security in the Asia-Pacific: China and the Emerging Order in the East and South China Seas

    While Asian regionalism has traditionally been weak in incorporating non-state interests, a breakthrough in maritime governance will depend on securing the representation of, and contributions from, non-state actors.

    Dr Kun-Chin Lin

    Dr Andrés Villar Gertner, Research Associate, Centre for Rising Powers; Teaching Associate, Centre of Latin Studies, University of Cambridge

  • The World Today

    Spanish politics has been infected by the Syriza virus

    After the Greek radicals' climbdown on austerity, Spain's Podemos is rethinking its previous embrace

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    José Ignacio Torreblanca is a Senior Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations

  • The World Today

    Diplomacy: Esprit de corps unharmed by job losses

    There are big changes underway in the attitude of French diplomats. But one thing doesn't change: moral depends on the relations between the foreign minister and the president.

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    Christian Lequesne is a professor of political science at Sciences Po Paris. He is the author, with Simon Bulmer, of ‘The Member States of the European Union’ (Oxford University Press, 2014) and is working on a book on contemporary French diplomats

  • The World Today

    Can China continue to dictate the news agenda online?

    The freedom of communication introduced by the internet was supposed to sound the death knell for state censorship. But authoritarian regimes still manage to control the message and how liberal digital media remains compromised. In the first of four articles, we look at how China continues to keep journalists on a short lead.

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    Vincent Ni is a journalist working for the BBC World Service in London

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