• The World Today

    Interview: Philippe Douste-Blazy

    The French cardiologist, politician and pioneer of micro-levies explains how adding one dollar to every airfare has raised $2.1 billion and can be a painless solution to improve the health of the world's poor.

    714Alan Philps
  • The World Today

    How the Sustainable Development Goals can be made to work for the world's poorest

    Fifteen years after the Millennium Development Goals were set in place, the UN's new targets are ambitious. They will need the mobilization of private finance and people all over the world holding their governments to account.

    417

    Mark Suzman is president of Global Policy, Advocacy, and Country Programs at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

  • The World Today

    The route to a safer future with fewer road deaths

    Globally, road traffic injuries are the leading cause of death among young people between 15 and 29. It's time to address this neglected and preventable challenge.

    714

    Lord Robertson of Port Ellen is Chairman of the Commission for Global Road Safety and a trustee of the FIA Foundation, a UK charity which supports international road traffic injury prevention

  • The World Today

    The West must address the chaos it has sown in the Middle East

    Bombing the jihadists of Islamic State will only create similar groups. What is needed is a non-military approach to the many problems of the region

    714Sami Abdel-Shafi
  • The World Today

    Expert view: What happens next after the Iran nuclear agreement?

    There will be shocks but Iran has more incentives to honour the agreement than to subvert it.

    714Sir Richard Dalton
  • The World Today

    Yemen: Aden is being torn apart

    Amid fractured alliances, the era of a united Yemen is coming to an end

    714

    Iona Craig won the 2014 Martha Gellhorn Prize for her ‘courageous, insightful and humane reporting’ from Yemen, and the Frontline Club print award in the same year for coverage of an American drone strike that hit a wedding convoy

  • The World Today

    UK tops soft power table despite China’s cultural blitz

    Competition to be the global No 1 in soft power is increasing as China embarks on a global diplomatic  offensive – but it is Britain that is still winning.

    Soft power – the ability of countries to get their way through influence, not military force – is no longer an aspect of international relations that is left to accidents of language, history or the reach of pop music.

    714
  • The World Today

    Yemen: Why is Riyadh flexing its muscles?

    Saudi Arabia’s air strikes on Yemen are causing concern among its allies

    714

    Peter Salisbury is an independent journalist and analyst

  • The World Today

    5 things: John Kerry

    1. John Kerry grew up with the privileges of the wealthy upper class – boarding schools in Switzerland and New England, learning fluent French and college at Yale. In fact his father was a State Department employee, his education was paid for a by great aunt, and he grew up feeling rootless. In the words of The Boston Globe, he was a gentleman without substance.Both his wives have been wealthy heiresses. 
    2. With the middle name Forbes, Kerry shares initials with John F Kennedy. While dating Jackie Kennedy’s half-sister, Kerry went sailing with the president in 1962.
    714
  • The World Today

    Postcard from… Piccadilly

    Lilliput for Syria’s refugees: An artist is pricking consciences in the West End

    714Alan Philps

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