• The World Today

    1950s: Protect Germany from itself

    How do you solve a problem like Germania? This question was at the heart of international politics throughout the 1950s. Germany needed reliable, democratic institutions and a new economic order.

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    John F Jungclaussen is London correspondent of Die Zeit

  • The World Today

    1960s: Revolution in Latin America

    The Marxist historian Eric Hobsbawm was prescient in predicting an uprising in Colombia which lasts to this day

    713Professor Victor Bulmer-Thomas, CMG, OBE
  • The World Today

    Expert view: Nepal after the earthquake

    The political fallout from Nepal’s natural disaster

    713Dr Gareth Price
  • The World Today

    1970s: The long shadow of Vietnam

    America’s rules of military engagement are changing at last as it adapts to a new world

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    Jurek Martin, a former foreign editor of the Financial Times, was also twice its Washington bureau chief and is now an FT US columnist

  • The World Today

    Fashion in phrases: The ever-changing lexicon

    The tables show when words or phrases made their first or last appearance in the pages of  The World Today. The ‘Third World’ had a 40-year run before it was challenged by ‘Global South’. ‘American decline’ appeared in 1988, but had to wait four years for ‘China’s rise’ to join it on the global seesaw. ‘Red lines’, which passed into common parlance after Barack Obama used the term in 2012, have been drawn in the sands of the Middle East since 1976. As for the phrases which have passed out of use, that Cold War stalwart, the ‘free world’, took an early bath in 1955.  Others have staggered on well after their sell-by date, often making their final appearance in embarrassed quotation marks. 

     

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  • The World Today

    Wresting order from the chaos

    The rules-based global order governing our lives since 1945 has become fragile. As Kevin Rudd writes in our cover story, this order must adapt if we are to avoid anarchy. How difficult this might be is illustrated by the accompanying pieces on the spread of nuclear weapons and the ongoing Israel-Palestine conflict, which have defied resolution for 70 years

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    Kevin Rudd, Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of Australia 2007-13, is President of the Asia Society Policy Institute in New York

  • The World Today

    From the editor

    How quickly do the words and phrases we use to describe the world change? For the 70th anniversary of The World Today, I have been delving into the archive to chart the fashions in international affairs. 

    712Alan Philps
  • The World Today

    Election jargonbuster

    Thank goodness the election is over. Depending on your view of the outcome, of course. But the one benefit on which we can all agree is that we will not hear the clichés peculiar to political campaigning for a while – possibly, not in such concentrated doses at least, for a whole five years. 

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  • The World Today

    1970s: The long shadow of Vietnam

    America’s rules of engagement are changing at last as it adapts to a new world

    713

    Jurek Martin, a former foreign editor of the Financial Times, was also twice its Washington bureau chief and is now an FT US columnist

  • The World Today

    5 things: David Maxwell Fyfe, human rights champion

    1. Born in 1900 to the headmaster of Aberdeen Grammar School, David Maxwell Fyfe was a British Conservative politician, lawyer and judge who served as Solicitor General, Attorney General, Home Secretary and Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain. 
    2. By 1934 he had become the youngest King’s Counsel in 250 years. In 1945, as deputy to the Attorney General, Sir Hartley Shawcross, Maxwell Fyfe became Britain’s deputy chief prosecutor in the Nuremberg trials.
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