Past event

Conference

Building the Water Agenda

Policy responses to water scarcity and shock

9 Jul 2012 - 00:00 to 11 Jul 2012 - 00:00

Chatham House, London

There is an increasing awareness of the need to act on the world’s impending water challenge.  Growing global resource use highlights the complex interdependencies between water and energy, agriculture, industry, urban growth and ecosystems. The challenge is compounded by climate change, which will lead to both water scarcity and unpredictable water-related shocks.

Governments and business need to prepare for long term water scarcity and for short-term shocks. They also need to consider the disruptive impacts of, and consequent political repercussions from, major water stress or shock on the world’s interconnected production, trade, and economic systems. Key issues that will be addressed include:

  • The challenges to addressing water issues at policy level nationally and internationally
  • What would effective global governance on water look like?
  • The interlinkages between energy, food and water security 
  • Prospects for widespread systemic disruption caused by water stress or shock
  • Flashpoints for transboundary water conflicts
  • The role of the private sector in achieving water security


  • Sanmit Ahuja

    • CEO and Co-founder
  • James Bacchus

    • Chair, Global Practice
  • Anders Berntell

    • Executive Director
  • Gidon Bromberg

    • Israeli Director
  • James Cameron

    • Chief Executive Officer
  • Peter C Evans

    • Director, Global Strategy and Planning
  • Professor David Grey

    • Visiting Professor of Water, Oxford University School of Geography & the Environment and
  • Professor Dr Pavel Kabat

    • Director and CEO
  • Tariq A Karim

    • High Commissioner for Bangladesh to India
  • Bernice Lee OBE

    • Research Director, Energy, Environment and Resources
  • Xavier Leflaive

    • Environment and Economy Integration Division
  • Professor Jacqueline McGlade

    • Executive Director
  • Tim Manning

    • Deputy Administrator for Protection and National Preparedness
  • Dr Polioptro F Martínez-Austria

    • Director General
  • Mike Muller

    • Commissioner
  • Sujiro Seam

    • Deputy Director, Global Public Goods
  • Dave Tickner

    • Head of Freshwater Programmes
  • Michael Wilshire

    • Director of Analysis
  • Michael Young

    • Professor, Water and Environmental Policy, The University of Adelaide and
  • Dr Mark Zeitoun

    • Director, UEA Water Security Research Centre

This conference will be held under the Chatham House Rule. Information for journalists
Press can request a press pass using the form below.



If you are interested in becoming a sponsor for this event, please contact Alison Archer on +44 (0)20 7314 3643 or email aarcher@chathamhouse.org.

 

IPWA



 

If you are interested in becoming a media partner for this event, please contact Esther Stoffels on +44 (0)20 7957 5753 or email estoffels@chathamhouse.org.

Venue

Chatham House

conferences@chathamhouse.org

Telephone: +44 (0)20 7957 5729
Fax: +44 (0)20 7957 5710


If you wish to book the venue for your event please phone +44 (0)20 7314 2764


Conference Unit
Chatham House
10 St James's Square
London
SW1Y 4LE
UK

Chatham House Location Map

Accommodation

Although we cannot book accommodation for delegates, we have arranged a reduced rate at some nearby hotels, where you can book your own accommodation. Please inform the hotel that you will be attending a conference at Chatham House (The Royal Institute of International Affairs) to qualify for the Institute's reduced rate.

Please note all rates are subject to availability.

Flemings Mayfair
Half Moon Street
Mayfair
London W1Y 7RA
Tel: + 44 (0)20 7499 2964
Fax: + 44 (0)20 7499 1817
Standard Single £180 + VAT

The Cavendish London
81 Jermyn Street
London
SW1U 6JF
Tel: + 44 (0)20 7930 2111
Fax: + 44 (0)20 7839 2125
Standard Single £200 + VAT

To book The Cavendish online

Day One
Monday 9 July 2012
09.30

Opening Session
Outlining the challenges

  • Water and its links to other global policy agendas: climate change, economic growth, agriculture, environment, human needs, foreign policy
  • The challenges of addressing water security at policy levels
  • What concrete and tangible pathways for policy and action are needed?

Chair  
Bernice Lee OBE
Research Director, Energy, Environment and Resources
Chatham House

Dr Polioptro F Martínez-Austria
Director General
Mexican Institute for Water Technology

Professor Dr Pavel Kabat
Director and CEO
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Questions and discussion

Session One
Water Stress: the new global shocks?

Water security is compromised by increasingly frequent extreme climate events. Both water stress and shock can cause disruption and humanitarian disaster. Water shocks can also disrupt the world’s increasingly interconnected production, trade and economic systems.  Policymakers need to address both – but how?

  • What should be the political, institutional and business responses to high impact, low probability water shocks? 
  • How should governments and business balance the costs of resilience with the cost of response to and recovery from major water shocks? Who should pay?
  • Are current and planned institutions and mechanisms for adaptation adequate to the challenge?


Chair  
David Grey
Visiting Professor of Water Policy
Oxford University School of Geography and Environment and
Honorary Visiting Professor, Exeter University Department of Politics

Tim Manning
Deputy Administrator for Protection and National Preparedness
Federal Emergency Management Agency, US Depsartment of Homeland Security

Bernice Lee OBE

Questions and discussion


11.45    Refreshments

Session Two
Reframing Transboundary Water Politics

  • What role does transboundary water play in relationships between states?
  • Where are the potential flashpoints for transboundary water conflicts?
  • What factors contribute to conflict or co-operation on transboundary water?
  • What policies and institutions can lead to agreements?


Gidon Bromberg
Israeli Director
Friends of the Earth

Tariq A Karim
High Commissioner for Bangladesh to India

Mark Zeitoun
Director, UEA Water Security Research Centre
University of East Anglia

Questions and discussion

13.30    Lunch

Session Three
Sectoral Competition for Water

Rapid increase in resource consumption by a growing world population and an expanding middle class is creating sectoral competition for resources. How can governments balance human, environmental, and economic demands for water? How can water rights best be established?

  • What data gaps are there on global water use?
  • With highly interconnected resources, increased resource consumption can lead to a vicious cycle of resource depletion. How should governments and business address this? 
  • Projected global water use by energy source
  • Where are the potential flashpoints between industrial and agricultural water use at national level? How can this be addressed at local level?
  • What role can the private sector have in addressing inter-sectoral competition for water?

Mike Muller
Commissioner
National Planning Commission, South Africa

Peter C Evans
Director, Global Strategy and Planning
GE Energy

Sanmit Ahuja
CEO and Co-founder
ETI Dynamics

Dave Tickner
Head of Freshwater Programmes
WWF UK

15.30    Refreshments

16.00    Questions and discussion

16.45    End of day one and drinks reception hosted by Chatham House


Day Two
Tuesday 10 July 2012

Session Four
New Tools for Water Management
Policy, pricing and investment

To be effective, water policy must operate at the global, regional, national, local and catchment levels, with linkages between each tier and between sectors (climate, food, energy, industry, environment, social). What tools can make national action on water effective?

  • What policy, governance and regulation is necessary for effective water management?
  • What incentives, standards, pricing and market signals would enhance supply and demand side efficiencies on water?
  • What financial innovations could manage water security risks?
    The respective roles of public and private finance in funding water infrastructure
  • What potential is there for water rich countries to use water to boost their economic development?

Chair
Mike Young
Professor, Water and Environmental Policy, University of Adelaide and
Honorary Professor, University College London

Xavier Leflaive
Environment and Economy Integration Division
Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development

Michael Wilshire
Director of Analysis
Bloomberg New Energy Finance

James Cameron
Chief Executive
National Water Commission, Australia

Anders Berntell
Executive Director
2030 Water Resources Group

Questions and discussion

11.15    Refreshments

Session Five
The New Global Water Agenda?

  • What are the obstacles to building a global water agenda? Which is the right forum to create a high level global agenda on water? (G20, UNFCCC, Rio+20, World Water Forum). Which tools would support such an agenda?
  • Should water be regarded as a global asset? If so, how can water be discussed, traded, or negotiated for?
  • To what extent can the concept of embedded water be a tool for water governance? What institutions would need to be involved?
  • Is national water management a precondition for building a global water agenda?
  • Spillovers to water shock and stress are global, so global tools are needed.  How can a global framework for water security be built?

Chair   
Bernice Lee OBE
Research Director, Energy, Environment and Resources
Chatham House

David Grey
Visiting Professor of Water Policy
Oxford University School of Geography and Environment and
Honorary Visiting Professor, Exeter University Department of Politics

Mike Muller
Commissioner
National Planning Commission, South Africa

Sujiro Seam
Deputy Director for Global Public Goods
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, France

James Bacchus
Chair, Global Practice, Global Practice Group
Greenberg Traurig, US

Professor Jacqueline McGlade
Executive Director
European Environment Agency

Questions and discussion

13.30    End of conference and lunch



© The Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2012