The Chatham House Rule helps create a trusted environment to understand and resolve complex problems. Its guiding spirit is: share the information you receive, but do not reveal the identity of who said it.

The Rule reads as follows:

When a meeting, or part thereof, is held under the Chatham House Rule, participants are free to use the information received, but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the speaker(s), nor that of any other participant, may be revealed.

The Rule explained

Meetings do not have to take place at Chatham House, or be organized by Chatham House, to be held under the Rule.

Any group of individuals in any sector can use the Rule as a pre-agreed guide for running an event, particularly when issues of a sensitive nature are to be discused.

In a polarized world, used effectively, the Chatham House Rule helps to bring people together, break down barriers, generate ideas and agree solutions.

Meetings, events and discussions held at Chatham House are normally conducted 'on the record' with the Rule occasionally invoked in relevant cases. In cases where the Rule is not considered sufficiently strict, an event may be held 'off the record'.

View our frequently asked questions below to learn more.

Translations

Notes

We cannot take any responsibility for any errors or misunderstandings that occur in the translations. The definitive Chatham House Rule was formulated in the English language. We are working to provide further translations.

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