China and the Future of the International Legal Order

Our work in this area examines how China is engaging with international law, including the international human rights system.

Through dialogue between Chinese public international lawyers and their non-Chinese counterparts, this project explores Chinese thinking on the content and direction of international law and considers the implications for global governance. How has China’s approach to international human rights law and the UN human rights mechanism evolved? To what extent does China engage with international dispute settlement mechanisms, whether in relation to maritime boundaries or trade agreements? 

More on China and the Future of the International Legal Order

Latest (22)
Research Event

The Future of Chinese Foreign Policy: Implications for International Law

Xi Jinping at the UN European headquarters in Geneva. Photo: Getty Images.
Expert comment

China Paves Its Way in New Areas of International Law

A Filipino fisherman operates around Scarborough Shoal, South China Sea, near a Chinese coast guard ship on 13 December 2016. Photo: The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images.
Chatham House Briefing

China’s Evolving Approach to International Dispute Settlement

Xi Jinping at Davos in January. Photo: Getty Images.
Expert comment

China and the WTO: How US Unpredictability Jeopardizes a Decade and a Half of Success

Xi Jinping visits the Olympic Museum in Lausanne following his speech at Davos. Photo by Getty Images.
Expert comment

Trumpian Isolationism Could Help China Become a Leader in International Law

Research Event

China and the Peaceful Settlement of Disputes

Research Event

South China Sea: The Result of the Arbitration

A poster showing a map of China, including Taiwan and the South China Sea, appeared in Weifang on 14 July 2016. Photo via Getty Images.
Expert comment

South China Sea Decision Is ‘Legal Shock Therapy’ for Beijing

A vendor in Beijing stands behind a map including an insert depicting the 'nine-dash line' in the South China Sea. Photo by Getty Images.
Expert comment

China's Fury Over South China Sea Belies Its Legal Insecurities

Research Event

The South China Sea Disputes: Current Status, Challenges and Prospects

Research Event

Chinese Approaches to Public International Law and the Rights of Individuals - Part Three

Research Event

International Human Rights Law in China: Does It Make a Difference?

The dilapidated Sierra Madre, a former US tank landing ship, in Ayungin Shoal. The Philippine military deliberately ran the ship aground to create an outpost against China in the Spratly Islands. Photo by The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images.
Expert comment

China’s Missed Opportunity in South China Sea Arbitration

An employee walks past dome structures used as nap rooms in the Baidu headquarters in Beijing on 12 November 2014. Photo via Getty Images.
Expert comment

China’s Cyber Diplomacy: A Taste of Law to Come?

China and the International Human Rights System
Research Event

Chinese Approaches to Public International Law and the Rights of Individuals - Part Two

The Representative of China at the 19th Session of the Human Rights Council, Palais des Nations, Geneva. 27 February 2012. Photo: UN Photo Geneva/Violaine Martin.
Research Event

Chinese Approaches to Public International Law and the Rights of Individuals

Chinese police take away an elderly woman for petitioning on Tiananmen Square on 4 December, 2013.  Photo by STR/AFP/Getty Images.
Expert comment

China's Careful Shift on Human Rights at the UN

Research Event

China and International Law

Research Event

China and the International Human Rights System

China and the International Human Rights System
Chatham House Report

China and the International Human Rights System

Pages