Past event

Conference

Extractive Industries in Africa

New Approaches to Overcome Enduring Challenges

16 Mar 2015 - 09:30 to 17 Mar 2015 - 13:00

Chatham House, London

Can Africa’s resource riches be translated into sustainable and inclusive growth? There are significant challenges to ensuring that the extractive industries generate jobs, revenue and infrastructure. As the number of industry actors multiplies, new partnerships are required to deliver results. 

In order to overcome these enduring challenges policymakers and business leaders must gain a fuller understanding of the societal, environmental and economic pressures facing African extractives. 

This conference will ask the key questions for the future of the industry, including:

  • How are technological, demographic and democratic changes affecting Africa’s extractive industries?
  • What immediate action is required to mitigate and manage long-term environmental impacts?
  • What legal frameworks and financial tools can maximise the economic potential of resource wealth?
  • Can new alliances share risk, attract investment and improve business practice?

Twitter
Suggested hashtag: #CHAfricaEx



 

Pricing

For any questions about rates, please call +44 (0)20 7314 2782.

 

                       FULL RATE
 EXCL. VATINCL. VAT
Major corporate member rates  
All organizations£625£750
Corporate member rates  
Commercial organizations£1,360£1,632
Government departments£795£954
NGOs and academics£525£630
Standard rates  
Commercial organizations£1,495£1,794 
Government departments£895£1,074
NGOs and academics£580£696
 

Monday 16 March
09:30

Opening Remarks
Professor Paul Stevens, Distinguished Fellow, Energy, Environment and Resources, Chatham House 

Session One | A Changing Landscape: Current Trends in Africa’s Extractive Industries and the Global Context
09:40-11:30 

Africa’s resource riches are often regarded as a potential catalyst for socioeconomic development. However, in a changing global context the prospects for translating subsoil resources into sustainable and inclusive growth remain uncertain. This session will give an overview of the current state of the industry, identify areas of growth and decline, and consider what baseline can be used to evaluate performance.

  • What do the ongoing shifts in the global macroeconomic environment and global commodity markets mean for the future development of extractive industries in Africa?
  • Should governments focus on extractive industries as a driver of economic growth? How do they compare with other key sectors?
  • How much can extractives-led growth deliver for Africa and how do the prospects differ between African countries?
  • What has been the impact of attempts by international mining, oil and gas companies to cut costs and reduce investment into capital-intensive greenfield projects?

Chair
Alan Davies, Chief Executive, Diamonds & Minerals, Rio Tinto

Speakers
Kerfalla Yansané, Minister of Mines, the Republic of Guinea

Rosalind Kainyah, Managing Director, Kina Advisory Limited

Jeffrey Currie, Global Head of Commodities Research, Global Investment Research, Goldman Sachs

Tom Burgis, Investigations Correspondent, Financial Times

Ian Gary, Senior Policy Manager for Extractive Industries, Oxfam America

Questions and discussion

Refreshments

Session Two | Democratization and Decentralization: How is Societal Change in Africa Affecting Extractive Industries?
11:30-13:15

African societies are increasingly connected, the voice of civil society is growing stronger in some countries, populations are younger and urban, and regions have the potential to become more powerful actors. Issues like corruption or impacts on local communities are more visible and as a result the extractives sector faces greater scrutiny than ever. This is reshaping the context in which companies are conducting their business and is challenging them to rethink their approach.

  • Beyond data and transparency: how can accountability and responsible practices in the sector be delivered?
  • What is necessary to develop an informed and inclusive dialogue about oil, gas and other mining and how can expectations about potential benefits best be managed?
  • What is the benchmark for corporate engagement at central and local level, and what is the appropriate balance between public social expenditure and private social investment?
  • What are the implications of efforts towards decentralization for industry and communities? How are new resource finds affecting the debate on decentralization?

Chair
Dr Muzong Kodi, Associate Fellow, Africa Programme, Chatham House

Speaker
Nii Osah Mills, Minister of Lands and Natural Resources, Ghana

Josephat Nanok, Governor of Turkana County, Kenya

Questions and discussion 

Moderated Panel Discussion
Dr Deborah Fahy Bryceson, Honorary Research Fellow, Centre of African Studies, University of Edinburgh; and Author, Mining and African Urbanisation: Population, Settlement and Welfare Trajectories

Dr Oladiran Bello, Head, Governance of Africa’s Resources Programme, South African Institute of International Affairs

Dr Layi Fatona, Managing Director, Niger Delta Exploration and Production 

Stéphane Brabant, Chairman of Africa Practice Group, Co-Head of Mining and Business and Human Rights Groups, Herbert Smith Freehills 

Questions and discussion 

13:15 - 14:15 Lunch

Session Three | Extractives and the Environment: Building Resilient Industries and Protecting Africa’s Natural Riches
14:15-16:15 

Generating local and national revenues from subsoil resources remains the overriding priority in many countries. It is increasingly recognized that in order to build resilient extractive industries, African governments and companies must also consider how to mitigate and manage long-term environmental impacts, as well as develop effective strategies to avoid risky lock-in to carbon-intensive development models. 

  • Where does environmental governance work best in African extractive industries? What types of mechanisms are needed to improve practices across the industry?
  • How do national development plans that emphasize climate-resilient low-carbon development sit with strategies to promote extractive industries? How can both agendas be reconciled?
  • Is there a role for extractive industries in providing energy access and scaling-up renewables? 

Chair 
Rob Bailey, Research Director, Energy, Environment and Resources, Chatham House

Moderated Panel Discussion
Ikal Angelei, Director, Friends of Lake Turkana

Sandy Stash, Vice President, Safety, Sustainability & External Affairs, Tullow Oil 

Jon Hobbs, Director, Extractives Sector, WWF International 

Mpho Mothoa, Managing Director, Richards Bay Minerals and Country Head for South Africa, Rio Tinto

Questions and discussion

Refreshments

Session Four | Leveraging Resource Wealth: Priorities for Attracting Investment, Securing Revenue and Building Strong Value Chains
16:15-18:00

To maximize benefits from extractive industries, countries need to strike a difficult balance between offering attractive terms for investment, generating tax revenue, incentivizing infrastructure investment and creating jobs. In a volatile environment, there are significant challenges to crafting consistent long-term government strategies. At the same time, businesses increasingly recognize that it is in their interest to support governments in achieving broader development objectives. 

  • How can countries develop resilient legal and contractual frameworks for mutual benefit? What is the best way for companies to deliver tangible benefits at the local and national level?
  • How has industry responded to measures to foster forward and backward linkages, such as local content or beneficiation requirements? Are they managing to encourage more local ‘added value’?
  • Securing revenues: what are the most effective tools for governments to discourage tax evasion and avoidance?
  • How can governments best ensure policy coherence across ministries and agencies with overlapping mandates?

Chair
Baroness Scotland of Asthal, HMG Envoy to South Africa; and President, Chatham House and Chair of the Advisory Board, The Queen Elizabeth II Academy for Leadership in International Affairs, Chatham House

Speaker
Ngoako Ramatlhodi, Minister of Mineral Resources, South Africa
Questions and discussion

Moderated Panel Discussion
Professor Roman Grynberg, Senior Research Fellow, Botswana Institute for Development Policy Analysis

Bram Posthumus, Associate Member, African Studies Centre, Leiden University

Dr Amy Jadesimi, Managing Director, LADOL

Michael Jarvis, Team Leader, Governance for Extractive Industries, The World Bank

Rachel Turner, Director for East and Central Africa, Department for International Development, UK

Questions and discussion

18:00 Close of day and drinks reception

Tuesday 17 March
Session Five | New Actors and Alliances in African Extractive Industries
09:30-11:15

Extractive industries in Africa now include private and state-backed enterprises from other emerging economies, home-grown companies, new sovereign investors, and independent exploration companies, as well as Western multinationals and donors. It has been suggested that in order to mobilize the large-scale investment needed in the sector, new types of partnerships and risk-sharing models must be developed across this diverse set of actors. 

  • What is the role of emerging economies such as India, Brazil and China in the future of Africa’s extractive industries?
  • How can new alliances be created to attract investment, improve business practices and unlock wider benefits?
  • What is needed to mitigate the risks and share the returns for large scale, capital-intensive greenfield projects? 
  • Enhancing cooperation: are there lessons that can be shared across the hydrocarbons and mining industries in particular contexts?

Chair 
Willy Olsen, Senior Adviser, INTSOK

Speakers
Rahul Dhir, Chief Executive Officer, Delonex Energy

Dr Ricardo Soares de Oliveira, Associate Professor of Comparative Politics, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford

Dr Sha Luo, Principal Consultant and Head, CRU Consulting, China

Alexandra Gillies, Head of Governance, Natural Resource Governance Institute 

Questions and discussion

Chair
Willy Olsen, Senior Adviser, INTSOK

Speaker
Clare Short, Chair, Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative

Questions and discussion

Refreshments

Concluding Session | Key Lessons and Ways Forward
11:45-13:00

This session will draw together the key takeaways from preceding discussions. Respondents will identify how different stakeholders can overcome the challenges facing the extractive industries in Africa.

Closing Chair
Dr Alex Vines, Research Director, Area Studies and International Law and Head, Africa Programme, Chatham House

Ministerial Discussion
Ngoako Ramatlhodi, Minister of Mineral Resources, South Africa

Nii Osah Mills, Minister of Lands and Natural Resources, Ghana 

Questions and discussion

13:00    End of conference and lunch

© The Royal Institute of International Affairs 2014

Speakers

Ikal Angelei

Director, Friends of Lake Turkana

Dr Oladiran Bello

Head, Governance of Africa’s Resources Programme, South African Institute of International Affairs

Stéphane Brabant

Chairman of Africa Group, Co-head of Mining and Business and Human Rights Groups, Herbert Smith Freehills

Dr Deborah Fahy Bryceson

Honorary Research Fellow, Centre of African Studies, University of Edinburgh

Tom Burgis

Investigations Correspondent, Financial Times

Jeffrey Currie

Global Head of Commodities Research, Global Investment Research, Goldman Sachs

Alan Davies

Chief Executive, Diamonds & Minerals, Rio Tinto

Rahul Dhir

Chief Executive Officer, Delonex Energy

Dr Layi Fatona

Managing Director, Niger Delta Exploration and Production

Ian Gary

Senior Policy Manager, Extractive Industries, Oxfam America

Alexandra Gillies

Head of Governance, Natural Resource Governance Institute

Professor Roman Grynberg

Senior Research Fellow, Botswana Institute for Development Policy Analysis

Jon Hobbs

Director, Extractives Sector, WWF International

Dr Amy Jadesimi

Managing Director, LADOL

Michael Jarvis

Team Leader, Governance for Extractive Industries, The World Bank

Rosalind Kainyah

Managing Director, Kina Advisory LTD

Dr Muzong Kodi

Associate Fellow, Africa Programme, Chatham House

Dr Sha Luo

Principal Consultant and Head, CRU Consulting, China

Mpho Mothoa

Managing Director, Richards Bay Minerals and Country Head for South Africa, Rio Tinto

Josephat Nanok

Governor of Turkana County, Kenya

Willy Olsen

Senior Adviser, INTSOK

Nii Osah Mills

Minister of Lands and Natural Resources, Ghana

Bram Posthumus

Associate Member, African Studies Centre, Leiden University

Ngoako Ramatlhodi

Minister of Mineral Resources, South Africa

Baroness Scotland of Asthal

HMG Envoy to South Africa; and President, Chatham House and Chair of the Advisory Board, The Queen Elizabeth II Academy for Leadership in International Affairs, Chatham House

Dr Ricardo Soares de Oliveira

Associate Professor of Comparative Politics, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford

Clare Short

Chair, Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative

Sandy Stash

VP Safety, Sustainability & External Affairs, Tullow Oil plc

Rachel Turner

Director for East and Central Africa, Department for International Development, UK

Alex Vines OBE

Research Director, Area Studies and International Law; Head, Africa Programme, Chatham House

Kerfalla Yansané

Minister of State, Minister of Mines and Geology, the Republic of Guinea

 

Venue

Chatham House
10 St James's Square
London
SW1Y 4LE
UK
[email protected]

Telephone: +44 (0)20 7957 5729
Fax: +44 (0)20 7957 5710

If you wish to book the venue for your event please phone +44 (0)20 7314 2764


Directions

The nearest tube station is Piccadilly Circus which is on the Piccadilly and the Bakerloo Underground lines. From Piccadilly follow Regent Street southwards towards Pall Mall and take the first road on the right called Jermyn Street. Duke of York Street is the second road on the left and leads to St James's Square. Chatham House is immediately on your right.

Map


Accommodation

Although we cannot book accommodation for delegates, we have arranged a reduced rate at some nearby hotels, where you can book your own accommodation. Please inform the hotel that you will be attending a conference at Chatham House (The Royal Institute of International Affairs) to qualify for the Institute's reduced rate.

Please note all rates are subject to availability.

Flemings Mayfair
Half Moon Street
Mayfair
London W1J 7BH
Tel: + 44 (0)20 7499 2964
Fax: + 44 (0)20 7499 1817
Standard Single from £199 + VAT

The Cavendish London
81 Jermyn Street
London
SW1Y 6JF
Tel: + 44 (0)20 7930 2111
Fax: + 44 (0)20 7839 2125
Standard Single £205 + VAT

To book The Cavendish online

The Stafford London by Kempinski
St James's Place
London
SW1A 1NJ
Tel: 020 7518 1125
Fax: 020 7493 7121
Standard Single £230 +VAT