Past event

Conference

Security and Defence in Europe

Diverging Interests, Fragmenting Policy

17 Mar 2016 - 09:00 to 18 Mar 2016 - 13:30

Chatham House, London

A series of political, economic and security crises have revealed new divisions among European states, weakening consensus and self-confidence with regard to European policy frameworks and institutional strength. It is as yet unclear whether European unity on defence and security questions can be re-established, or whether Europe is moving into a new era, with increasing importance placed on bilateral arrangements. Policymakers and industry leaders must now consider these divergences to identify the most effective approaches to European security and defence, anticipate shifts in security relationships, and evaluate the ongoing significance of international institutions.  

This conference will examine changing national and supranational approaches to security and defence, how and why interests and responses are diverging, the potential impact on policy and industry developments over the next few years, and to what extent there is a major and irreversible shift underway in European security strategies.

Discussions will assess:

  • The implications for Europe’s structures and partners
  • Critical challenges for European security including the roles of member states
  • The structure of defence institutions, and the relevance of divergent policy outlooks
  • The potential for international industry cooperation and leadership 

The Chatham House Rule 
To enable as open a debate as possible, this conference will be held under the Chatham House Rule.

Twitter 
Suggested hashtag: #CHDefence

Pricing

For any questions about which rate applies to you, please call +44 (0) 20 7957 5727

                       FULL RATE
 EXCL. VATINCL. VAT
Major corporate member rates  
All organizations£645£774
Corporate member rates  
Commercial organizations£1,390£1,668
Government departments£820£984
NGOs and academics£540£648
Standard rates  
Commercial organizations£1,535£1,842 
Government departments£920£1,104
NGOs and academics£595

£714

Thursday 17 March
0930

Session One | Contrasting Approaches or a Common Policy
09:30 - 11:30  

This session will examine how policy fragmentation across Europe reflects diverging interests; how this affects a common approach to security and defence; and whether further European integration is thus possible or desirable. 

  • Is there still a common vision for European security?
  • Who are the most influential actors in this sphere, and how do their interests overlap or diverge?
  • Where are the main fault lines for diverging interests - differing assessments of threats from neighbouring regions, differing strategic cultures, different ambitions for the European Project, or domestic political stresses?
  • Do security interests among European states diverge more or less than their economic and political interests? What does this mean for further European integration?
  • What is the significance of national economic policy, in particular with regard to austerity measures, when examining differences in security outlook?
  • What does this mean for the feasibility of a common European security policy?

Chair's opening remarks
James de Waal, Senior Fellow, International Security, Chatham House

Ministerial addresses
Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, Minister of Defence, The Netherlands (on the record)
Questions and discussion 

Roberta Pinotti, Minister of Defence, Italy (on the record)
Questions and discussion

Speakers
Tomáš Valášek, Permanent Representative of the Slovak Republic to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and Honorary Chairman, Central European Policy Institute
Jonathan Hoyle, Vice President, Europe and the Americas, Lockheed Martin

Questions and discussion 

​11:30 - 12:00 Refreshments


Session Two | Responses to Security Threats
12:00 - 13:10 

This session will consider what European responses to recent security issues mean for potential future policy consensus, industry strategy, and a coherent Euro-Atlantic security policy.

  • Why and how have Western responses to the Ukraine crisis varied, and how has this affected the wider European security system?
  • How agile and effective have European states and their partners been in adapting to this new situation, repairing weaknesses and preparing for the future? What can this tell us about effective security policy approaches?
  • To what extent do these differing outlooks reflect differing capability requirements? How can industrial stakeholders effectively accommodate diverging security and defence response approaches?   
  • How have NATO and EU responses exhibited fundamental differences, and to what extent can these responses be better coordinated? Is there room for deeper cooperation? 
  • How have recent crises highlighted different Euro-Atlantic attitudes to nuclear weapons? What are the implications?

Chair
Sir Lawrence Freedman, Emeritus Professor of War Studies, King’s College London

Speakers
Dr Igor Ivanov, President, Russian International Affairs Council; Minister of Foreign Affairs, Russia (1998-04)
Brigadier General Jo Coelmont, Senior Associate Fellow, EGMONT, The Royal Institute for International Relations 
Jorge Domecq, Chief Executive, European Defence Agency 
James Appathurai, Deputy Assistant Secretary General for Political Affairs and Security Policy; Secretary General’s Special Representative to the Caucasus and Central Asia, NATO

Questions and discussion

13:10 - 14:30 Lunch  
 

Session Three | Consensus and the Future of Institutions
14:30 - 15:50

This session will examine the extent of existing European security consensus within intergovernmental organizations to explore their future structure and strength.

  • How much consensus has there been within NATO and the EU regarding risks and responses to crises such as those involving Russia, Libya and Syria? To what extent has this demonstrated the importance of security consensus for institutional strength? 
  • Is a lack of cohesion reflected in other security bodies, such as the OSCE and the Council of Europe? 
  • Do ongoing policy differences foreshadow the end of the European Project? What form will European institutions take in the future, and what is the likelihood of their survival? To what extent are they likely to become “hollowed-out” or multispeed? 
  • To what extent do ongoing security issues, such as the Syrian migration crisis, illustrate critical challenges in establishing a common economic and political space without a common foreign and security policy?
  • In what ways have we seen a cross-border industry consolidation of the European defence base, and what are its implications for policy consensus?

Chair
Lord Robertson of Port Ellen, Special Adviser, BP; Member, Panel of Senior Advisers, Chatham House; Secretary General, NATO (1999-03); Defence Secretary, UK (1997-99)

Ministerial address
Dr Katrin Suder, State Secretary, Federal Ministry of Defence, Germany 
Questions and discussion

Speakers
Marcin Terlikowski, Head, European Security and Defence Economics Project, The Polish Institute of International Affairs
Professor Dr Ismail Demir, Under-Secretary for Defence Industries, Turkey
Charles Grant, Director, Centre for European Reform
Johan Lagerlöf, Defence Policy Director, Ministry of Defence, Sweden

Questions and discussion

15:50 - 16:20 Refreshments


Session Four | Bilateral Arrangements versus Institutional Cooperation
16:20 - 17:45 

This session will examine the proliferation and nature of bilateral security agreements, the drivers behind their ascent, their implications for industry, and the extent to which they may become the norm, as well as the effect of ongoing regional developments on institutional cooperation and strength.

  • What has driven the growing preference for bilateral and ad hoc security arrangements? Is this the result of changing interests or of changes in the character of conflict?
  • How will regional developments continue to impact institutional cooperation and continue to impact the strength and structure of European security arrangements? 
  • How can industry effectively respond to the changing nature and significance of these relationships?
  • What is the role, structure and significance of the United States’ bilateral security agreements? To what extent have these agreements impacted on or been impacted by the potential for European security cooperation?
  • In what ways does the focus of recent agreements, for example the importance of intelligence cooperation, indicate a shift in national security concerns? 
  • If security arrangements are increasingly bilateral or ad hoc, how can security responses be coordinated with non-security measures, such as economic action?
  • To what extent are industrial relationships in security and defence becoming increasingly bilateral and ad-hoc, and what are the implications for future strategic partnerships? 

Chair
Dr Antonio Missiroli, Director, European Union Institute for Security Studies

Ministerial address
Tinatin Khidasheli, Minister of Defence, Georgia (on the record)
Questions and discussion

Speakers
Julianne Smith, Senior Fellow and Director of the Strategy and Statecraft Program, Centre for a New American Security
Fabrice Pothier, Head, Policy Planning, Secretary General’s Office, NATO
Dr Spyros Economides, Associate Professor, International Relations and European Politics, London School of Economics

Questions and discussion 
  

1745    Close of day one and reception hosted by Chatham House

 

Friday 18 March
0930

Session Five | Leadership in Security
09:30 - 11:00 

This session will look at how recent economic and political crises have shifted the balance of power among European states, institutions and organisations, and who – if anyone – might now take a leadership role in shaping European security policy.

  • In what ways is Germany increasingly playing a leadership role in Europe? What is the prevalent domestic policy outlook with regard to armed force, and does this leave a vacuum in the European security approach?
  • To what extent has Germany traditionally embedded its national interest within European structures? How may changing European structures affect the representation of this interest?
  • Can other states or groups of states provide alternative leadership, and what impact might this have on the future security direction of Europe? What role does industry continue to play in European security leadership? 
  • What is the attitude and role of the US with regard to European security leadership? What are the ongoing implications of this? 
  • What do these developments tell us about the relationship between economic leadership and security leadership? Can the two be separated?
  • What challenges will diverging security interests in Europe continue to pose for international organizations and their leadership in peacekeeping efforts worldwide? 

Chair
James de Waal, Senior Fellow, International Security, Chatham House​

Keynote address
Lamberto Zannier, Secretary General, Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (on the record)
Questions and discussion

Speakers
Dr Patrick Keller, Coordinator, Foreign and Security Policy, Konrad Adenauer Foundation 
Camille Grand, Director, Fondation pour la recherche stratégique 
Rachel Ellehuus, Principal Director, European and NATO Policy, US Department of Defense
Hervé Ladsous, Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations, United Nations Peacekeeping

Questions and discussion 

11:00 - 11:30 Refreshments  


Session Six | The UK and the EU
11:30 -13:00 

This discussion will assess the UK’s future relationship with the European Union and what potential developments and reforms may mean for long-term cooperation on security and defence.

  • How do the UK’s European and North American partners view the British debate on its EU membership from a security and defence perspective? What would be the impact on European security if the UK were to exit the EU?
  • To what extent is the UK's membership of the EU perceived as independent of its role as a NATO member state? How does this perception affect attitudes towards security policy? 
  • How would a decision to leave the EU affect the ability of the UK to foster effective collaboration with EU member states on foreign and security affairs? How would it affect this ability globally?
  • What would the UK need to do to have an effective European security policy outside the EU? How would this affect its relationship with NATO and the US?
  • What do recent domestic political developments in the UK suggest about popular attitudes towards Britain’s traditional nuclear and NATO-based approaches to its security?

Chair
Jonathan Beale, Defence Correspondent, BBC​

Panel Discussion
Professor Malcolm Chalmers, Deputy Director-General, Royal United Services Institute
Hans Pung, President, RAND Europe 
Karen E Smith, Professor, International Relations and Director, European Foreign Policy Unit, London School of Economics
Dr Tarja Cronberg, Distinguished Associate Fellow, European Security Programme, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Questions and discussion

1300    Close of conference and lunch

 

© The Royal Institute of International Affairs 2016

Keynote Speakers

Speakers

James Appathurai

Deputy Assistant Secretary General for Political Affairs; Security Policy and Secretary General’s Special Representative for the Caucasus and Central Asia, NATO

Jonathan Beale

Defence Correspondent, BBC

Professor Malcolm Chalmers to speak at the Chatham House Security and Defence in Europe 2016 conference

Professor Malcolm Chalmers

Deputy Director, RUSI

Brigadier General Jo Coelmont to speak at Chatham House Security and Defence 2016 conference

Brigadier General Jo Coelmont

Senior Associate Fellow, EGMONT, Royal Institute for International Relations

Tarja Cronberg to speak at the Chatham House Security and Defence in Europe conference

Dr Tarja Cronberg

Distinguished Associate Fellow, European Security Programme, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Professor Dr Ismail Demir to speak at the Chatham House Security and Defence in Europe 2016 conference

Professor Dr Ismail Demir

Under-Secretary for Defence Industries, Turkey

James de Waal

Senior Fellow, International Security, Chatham House

Jorge Domecq to speak at Chatham House Security and Defence 2016 conference

Jorge Domecq

Chief Executive, European Defence Agency

Dr Spyros Economides to speak at Chatham House Security and Defence in Europe 2016 conference

Dr Spyros Economides

Associate Professor of International Relations and European Politics, LSE

Rachel Ellehuus

Deputy Director in the Europe and NATO office, United States Department of Defense

Sir Lawrence Freedman to speak at Chatham House Security & Defence in Europe 2016 conference

Sir Lawrence Freedman

Emeritus Professor of War Studies, King's College London

Camille Grand to speak at the Chatham House Security and Defence in Europe 2016 conference

Camille Grand

Managing Director, Fondation pour la Recherche Stratégique

Charles Grant to speak at Chatham House Security and Defence 2016 conference

Charles Grant

Director, Centre for European Reform

Jonathan Hoyle to speak at Chatham House Security & Defence in Europe 2016 conference

Jonathan Hoyle

Vice President, Europe and the Americas, Lockheed Martin

Igor Ivanov to speak at the Chatham House Security and Defence in Europe 2016 conference

Dr Igor Ivanov

President, Russian International Affairs Council (RIAC); Minister of Foreign Affairs, Russia (1998-04)

Patrick Keller to speak at Chatham House Security and Defence 2016 conference

Dr Patrick Keller

Coordinator of Foreign and Security Policy, Konrad Adenauer Foundation

Hervé Ladsous to speak at the Chatham House Security and Defence in Europe 2016 conference

Hervé Ladsous

Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations, United Nations

Johan Lagerlof to speak at the Chatham House Security and Defence in Europe 2016 conference

Johan Lagerlöf

Defence Policy Director, Ministry of Defence, Sweden

Dr Antonio Missiroli to speak at the Chatham House Security and Defence in Europe conference

Dr Antonio Missiroli

Director, European Union Institute for Security Studies

Fabrice Pothier to speak at Chatham House Security and Defence in Europe 2016 conference

Fabrice Pothier

Head of Policy Planning, Secretary General’s Office, NATO

Hans Pung to speak at the Chatham House Security and Defence in Europe 2016 conference

Hans Pung

President, RAND Europe

The Rt Hon Lord Robertson to speak at the Chatham House Security and Defence in Europe 2016 conference

Lord Robertson of Port Ellen

Special Adviser, BP; Member, Panel of Senior Advisers, Chatham House; Secretary General, NATO (1999-03); Defence Secretary, UK (1997-99)

Julie Smith to speak at Chatham House Security and Defence 2016 conference

Julianne Smith

Senior Fellow and Director of the Strategy and Statecraft Program, Centre for a New American Security

Karen Smith to speak at the Chatham House Security and Defence in Europe 2016 conference

Karen Smith

Professor, International Relations and Director, European Foreign Policy Unit, London School of Economics

Marcin Terlikowski to speak at the Chatham House Security and Defence in Europe 2016 conference

Marcin Terlikowski

Head, European Security and Defence Economics Project, The Polish Institute of International Affairs

Tomáš Valášek to speak at Chatham House Security and Defence 2016 conference

Tomáš Valášek

Permanent Representative of the Slovak Republic to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and Honorary Chairman, Central European Policy Institute

Sponsor
 Lockheed Martin to sponsor the Chatham House Security and Defence in Europe 2016 conference

If you are interested in becoming a sponsor for this event, please contact Ben Cumming on
+44 (0) 20 7957 5729 or email bcumming@chathamhouse.org

Media partners

EPICOS to partner with Chatham House on the Security and Defence in Europe conference 2016
European Defence Matters to partner with Chatham House on the Security and Defence in Europe conference
Foreign Affairs
NDI to partner with Chatham House on the Security and Defence 2016 conference

techUK to partner with Chatham House on the Security and Defence in Europe conference

Ukspace to partner with Chatham House at Security and Defence 2016 conference


If you are interested in becoming a media partner for this event, please contact Amy Smith on
+44 (0)20 7957 5755 or email asmith@chathamhouse.org 

Venue

Chatham House
10 St James's Square
London
SW1Y 4LE
UK
conferences@chathamhouse.org

Telephone: +44 (0)20 7314 2785
Fax: +44 (0)20 7957 5710

If you wish to book the venue for your own event please phone +44 (0)20 7314 2764

Directions
The nearest tube station is Piccadilly Circus which is on the Piccadilly and the Bakerloo Underground lines. From Piccadilly follow Regent Street southwards towards Pall Mall and take the first road on the right called Jermyn Street. Duke of York Street is the second road on the left and leads to St James's Square. Chatham House is immediately on your right.

Map

Accommodation
Although we cannot book accommodation for delegates, we have arranged a reduced rate at some nearby hotels, where you can book your own accommodation. Please inform the hotel that you will be attending a conference at Chatham House (The Royal Institute of International Affairs) to qualify for the Institute's reduced rate.

Please note all rates are subject to availability.

Flemings Mayfair
Half Moon Street
Mayfair
London - W1J 7BH

Tel: + 44 (0)20 7499 2964
Fax: + 44 (0)20 7499 1817

Standard Single from £195 + VAT

The Cavendish London
81 Jermyn Street
London - SW1Y 6JF

Tel: + 44 (0)20 7930 2111
Fax: + 44 (0)20 7839 2125

Standard Single £205 + VAT

Book The Cavendish online

The Stafford London 
St James's Place
London - SW1A 1NJ

Tel: 020 7518 1125
Fax: 020 7493 7121

Standard Single £235 +VAT

The Savoy London
Strand
London - WC2R 0EU

Tel: 020 7836 4343
Fax: 020 7240 6040 

Standard Single from £250 +VAT

This conference will be held under the Chatham House Rule. Information for journalists.

Press can request a press pass.