Past event

Special Event

China: Forging a path to greater global growth

20 Nov 2006 - 00:00 to 21 Nov 2006 - 00:00

Chatham House, London

Event documents

Agenda
pdf | 533.79 KB
Final Report _ Evian Group at IMN - CEIBS China Meeting Shanghai
pdf | 74.07 KB

Overview

China's economic reforms, trade and both inward and outward investments have been the most dynamic elements in the world economy and among the most positive. China has contributed significantly to global growth in the last decade and potentially stands to contribute much more in the years and decades ahead. China is simultaneously a developing economy, an economy in transition and a global economic power, acting as a powerful growth engine for the developing world and as the US' major creditor. This is totally unprecedented, hence uncharted territory.

Cleary, there are pitfalls and challenges that need to be intelligently and strategically addressed both outside China and within China. Fear of China and trade frictions with diverse economic partners could pose future risks. How can they be avoided? Fear of China and trade frictions with diverse economic partners could pose future risks. How can they be avoided? Not just for its own sake, but for the global economy, China's growth needs to be sustained.

Furthermore, with the collapse of the Doha Round, there is an ever rising risk that the global economy might fragment into a noodle bowl of PTAs (preferential trade agreements) that will, at best, result in rising transactions costs and fiendishly increased complexities. The 2006 Evian Group China meeting will address some of these hard issues and seek solutions.

This roundtable meeting is organized by the Evian Group in association with Chatham House. It will be held at the China-Europe International Business School, Shanghai.

Panel discussions include topics such as Chinese Business and the Global Market, and China's Role & Responsibilities in the Global Economic System. Paola Subacchi and Vanessa Rossi are on the panel which looks at Risks of a Two-Tier Economy.