The panel discuss what the annexation of Crimea means for European security, the challenges of defending human rights in the region and how international efforts to improve the situation in Crimea can be strengthened.

14 March 2018

Speakers

Akhtem Chiygoz, Deputy Chairman, Crimean Tatar Mejlis
Anna Fotyga, Chair, Security and Defence Subcommittee, European Parliament; Minister of Foreign Affairs, Poland (2006-07)
Ilmi Umerov, Deputy Chairman, Crimean Tatar Mejlis; Former Head of Bakhchisaray District Administration, Crimea
Chair: Orysia Lutsevych, Ukraine Forum, Chatham House

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The annexation of Crimea is steadily disappearing from international debates and policy discussions. However, a recent Chatham House report, The Struggle for Ukraine, has highlighted the need to keep the illegal annexation in the spotlight until Ukraine’s internationally recognized borders are restored. With over 60 Crimean Tatars currently imprisoned, and other opponents of the annexation facing ongoing repression, human rights in the peninsula are under threat.

The panel discuss what the annexation of Crimea means for European security, the challenges of defending human rights in the region – especially when facilitating the release of political prisoners - and how international efforts to improve the situation in Crimea can be strengthened.

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