In 2011, many Syrians took to the streets of Damascus to demand the overthrow of the government of Bashar al-Assad. Today, much of Syria has become a warzone and many worry that the country is on the brink of collapse.

28 January 2016

Speakers

Mina Al-Oraibi, Journalist on Middle East affairs
Robin Yassin-Kassab, Author, Burning Country: Syrians in Revolution and War
Chair: Dr Neil Quilliam, Acting Head, Middle East and North Africa Programme, Chatham House

Share

In 2011, many Syrians took to the streets of Damascus to demand the overthrow of the government of Bashar al-Assad. Today, much of Syria has become a warzone and many worry that the country is on the brink of collapse.

Drawing on first-hand testimonies from opposition fighters, exiles and human rights activists, the panel explores the complicated reality of life in present-day Syria. Looking at the militarization of the uprising, the rise of the Islamists and sectarian warfare, and the role of Syria’s government in the conflict, the speakers discuss the issues from the grassroots to the geopolitical, including the role of the international community in bringing to an end the bloodshed.

Share