The panel discussed where the main turning points for global order were emerging. It was broadly agreed that the US stays relevant because of its security contribution, but the contrast is with China.

23 October 2017

Speakers

Joseph Chin Yong Liow, Dean and Professor of Comparative and International Politics, S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies
Pawel Świeboda, Deputy Head of the European Political Strategy Centre, European Commission
Alexei Chekunkov, Chief Executive Officer, Far East and Baikal Region Development Fund
Mina Al-Oraibi, Editor-in-Chief, The National
Chair: Robin Niblett, Director, Chatham House

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The panel discussed where the main turning points for global order were emerging. In looking at the approach of the United States under the Trump administration, it was pointed out that in some regions, like the Middle East, Trump’s more transactional approach was received as more honest than the Obama administration and previous presidencies, whose words were often not backed up by action.

It was broadly agreed that the US stays relevant because of its security contribution, but in economic terms, the contrast is with China, which is felt to have less of an interest in trying to export its way of life.

As some of the economic anxiety in Western countries can be drawn to the rise of China and other newly industrialized countries, the relationship and interplay between China and the US is inescapable.

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