On 12 July, the Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA) in the Hague released its ruling in the case of the Philippines v China. Our panel looked at the ruling and what effect, if any, it might have on China’s policy towards its South China Sea.

Ashley Townshend, Research Fellow, United States Studies Centre, University of Sydney; Visiting Fellow, Center for Asia-Pacific Cooperation and Governance, Fudan University, Shanghai
Chair: Bill Hayton, Associate Fellow, Asia Programme, Chatham House

01:04:18

Overview

On 12 July, the Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA) in the Hague released its ruling in the case of the Philippines v China. The case, unilaterally brought by the Philippines, sought to clarify whether China’s historic claims on the waters, seabed and maritime features of the South China Sea, as manifested by its so-called ‘nine-dash line’, are consistent with the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea.

Our panel looked at the ruling and discussed what effect, if any, it might have on China’s policy towards its South China Sea neighbours.

More information at The South China Sea Arbitration: A Turning Point for China's Regional Policy?