This event brought together academics, business representatives, diplomats and government representatives, relevant stakeholders from across Whitehall departments and other experts to discuss what the UK’s vision for post-Brexit Africa will be.

21 April 2017

Speakers

Professor Carlos Lopes, Graduate School of Development Policy and Practice, University of Cape Town; Executive Secretary, United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (2012-16)

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The House of Commons voted in February to begin negotiations on triggering Article 50 – the formal process by which the UK will leave the EU. Theresa May and the government have advocated for a Brexit which will see the UK exit the EU single market and its Customs Union while restricting EU migration. But with Brexit being mapped out by a government, many of whom campaigned to remain, does the current strategy reflect the will of Leave voters and the promises of those politicians and public voices that campaigned to leave? This event examined the direction of the exit process since the referendum from the perspective of Leave supporters and campaigners. What kind of Brexit could produce the sovereignty of law, reduced immigration, stronger border controls and economic independence that formed the central pillars of the different Leave campaigns? How can those not in government ensure that domestic spending promises referenced during the referendum are kept? And crucially, what tools are available to those that campaigned for Leave to ensure that they can hold to account those responsible for implementing Brexit?

This event brought together academics, business representatives, diplomats and government representatives, relevant stakeholders from across Whitehall departments and other experts to discuss what the UK’s vision for post-Brexit Africa will be.

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