1645–1800

While the demand for international cooperation on specific issues from climate change to internet governance is growing, so far no single country, group of countries, region or idea has shown itself capable of leading the way to new forms of global order. Should countries adjust to a leaderless world mitigated by ad hoc cooperation, keep trying to redesign existing institutions or design new ones?

Discussion points

  • Are current conflicts a symptom of the unravelling of the post-Second World War structures of institutional order?
  • What are the implications of the United States substantially retreating from its global leadership role?
  • Will the distinction between established and rising powers grow less relevant in a leaderless world,  or will like-minded powers form new types of interest blocs?
  • Can we expect a return to international competition between state ideologies and cultures or the rise of anarchy?

Panellists

Heba Al-Nasser, Research Fellow, Queen Elizabeth II Academy for Leadership In International Affairs, Chatham House
Børge Brende, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Norway
Sergei Karaganov , Dean, Faculty of World Economy and International Affairs, National Research University Higher School of Economics; Foreign policy adviser to the Presidential Administration, Russia (2001–13) 
Joseph S Nye  , University Distinguished Service Professor, Harvard Kennedy School of Government
Dr WU Xinbo  , Director, Center for American Studies, and Executive Dean, Institute of International  Studies, Fudan University

Moderator:  Zeinab Badawi , Presenter, World News Today, BBC

Session Paper

CHALLENGES TO THE RULES-BASED INTERNATIONAL ORDER

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