Past event

Conference

Innovation 2012: Science, Technology and Competitiveness

5 Mar 2012 - 00:00 to 6 Mar 2012 - 00:00

Chatham House, London

The Innovation 2012 conference will discuss the expectations and political constraints placed upon science and technology’s contribution to global prosperity. It will examine the circumstances under which curiosity-driven innovation flourishes and asses what systems and networks need to be in place to optimize its opportunities. 

  • Is scientific innovation the magic bullet in addressing global challenges and generating prosperity?
  • How might technological advances disrupt the current economic and social models?
  • Is an 'open society' prerequisite to enabling innovation or does a ‘closed’ political regime or a government of technocrats deliver better results for today’s challenges?
  • Do nations require their own scientific and research base to be innovative? What are the other enabling factors?
  • What role should the public play in deciding the future directions of scientific research and technology?
  • The politics of evidence: is science policy in reality driven by the public’s perception of risk?
  • Should access to scientific data be made public at all stages of research? What could be the consequences of such an approach?  

Registration

  • Dirk van den Berg

    • President, Executive Board
  • Sir John Chisholm

    • Chairman
  • Clive Cookson

    • Science Editor
  • Ben Hammersley

    • Editor at Large
  • Dr Hermann Hauser

    • Partner
  • Rt Hon Lord Howell

    • Minister of State
  • Parag Khanna

    • Director
  • Professor Sir Peter Knight FRS

    • President
  • Dr Bruce Levell

    • Chief Scientist, Geology
  • Peter Luff MP

    • Minister for Defence Equipment, Support and Technology
  • Mariana Mazzucato

    • Professor of Economics and RM Phillips Chair in Science and Technology Policy
  • Professor Rongping Mu

    • Director General, Institute of Policy and Management
  • Professor Helga Nowotny

    • President
  • Naledi Pandor

    • Minister of Science and Technology
  • James Wilsdon

    • Professor of Science and Democracy

This conference will be held under the Chatham House Rule. Information for journalists
Press can request a press pass using the form below.

If you are interested in becoming a sponsor for this event, please contact Zuzana Feachem on +44 (0)20 7957 5755 or email zfeachem@chathamhouse.org

 

Elsevier

 

Insititute of Physics


Intellect

 

AAAS-Science



Science Business

 

 



Venue

Chatham House
10 St James's Square
London
SW1Y 4LE

Tel: +44 (0)20 7957 5700
Fax: +44 (0)20 7957 5710

Chatham House Location Map

Accommodation

Although we cannot book accommodation for delegates, we have arranged a reduced rate at some nearby hotels, where you can book your own accommodation. Please inform the hotel that you will be attending a conference at Chatham House (The Royal Institute of International Affairs) to qualify for the Institute's reduced rate.

Please note all rates are subject to availability.

Flemings Mayfair
Half Moon Street
Mayfair
London W1Y 7RA
Tel: + 44 (0)20 7499 2964
Fax: + 44 (0)20 7499 1817
Standard Single £180 + VAT

The Cavendish London
81 Jermyn Street
London
SW1U 6JF
Tel: + 44 (0)20 7930 2111
Fax: + 44 (0)20 7839 2125
Standard Single £200 + VAT

To book The Cavendish online

DAY ONE
Monday 5 March 2012
9.30

Session One
Surfing the Long Wave: The coming century of creative disruption

  • Is scientific innovation the magic bullet in addressing global challenges and generating prosperity?
  • How might technological advances disrupt the current economic and social models, national identities and relations between states?
  • What might be the unintended consequences of rapid technological advancement? To what extent might these developments be disruptive?
  • Is an 'open society' prerequisite to enabling innovation (learning styles, freedom and incentives) or does a ‘closed’ political regime or a government of technocrats deliver better results for today’s challenges?


Session Two
Unleashing the Smart Power of Science and Innovation

  • Will science discovery and resulting technologies be a critical driver of a nation’s future global position? The United States, Europe, China and India: where are the future science and economic superpowers?
  • Do nations require their own scientific and research base to be innovative? What are the other enabling factors?
  • What is the role of public policy and the entrepreneurial state in meeting innovation-related ambitions?


Session Three
Networks of Innovation and the Changing Role of the Private Sector

  • Where will the game-changing technologies of tomorrow come from and what are the new sources of competitive advantage?
  • To what extent are new media agents of potential disruption to traditional business models?
  • Industry’s 'know-how account': changes in demand necessitate diversification from an industry’s primary activity - how can advances at the frontiers of scientific discovery be translated into new ventures?
  •  What are the strengths and strategies necessary to enhance company assets – from human resources to patents?
  •  Rethinking the innovation ecosystem: how can open innovation, growth clusters and collaboration co-exist with commercialization?


DAY TWO
Tuesday 6 March 2012
9.30

Session Four
Open Innovation v Intellectual Property Rights?

  • Is openness in the public interest given the potential conflict with commercial and individual interests? 
  • Should access to scientific data be made public at all stages of research?  What could be the consequences of such approach?
  • Should data openness apply only to publicly funded research? What about clinical trials data or data generated by private sector used to inform policy decisions about public safety?
  • Would scientists from all jurisdictions be willing to share data?


Session Five
Science and Technology Policies and the Role of Public Opinion

  • What role should the public play in deciding the future directions of scientific research and technology?
  • The politics of evidence: is science policy in reality driven by the public’s perception of risk? (e.g. German nuclear energy policy change as a reaction to Fukushima)
  • Responsible innovation: can science policy exist in a vacuum?
  • To what extent should scientific pursuits and technological development be driven by the public’s perception of risk? Or can risk assessment be left to scientists alone?

 

© The Royal Institute of International Affairs 2011