Poland's Foreign and Security Policy Priorities

Kerry Longhurst and Marcin Zaborowski

This book is an authoritative account of Poland's emerging foreign and security policies and will contribute to an understanding of the foreign policy preferences of an enlarged EU.

Of all the countries that joined the EU in 2004 Poland was by far the largest and the most vocal. Its confidence and assertiveness over the European constitution, together with its strong support for US policy over Iraq, suggested that Warsaw was determined from the start to be a heavyweight in the new Europe. Given its military potential, its proven capacity to use armed force and its de facto role as a regional leader, it is clear that Poland will have a defining influence not only on the nature of transatlantic relations, but also on the EU's emerging international identity.

This book is the first authoritative account of Poland's emerging foreign and security policies and will contribute to an understanding of the foreign policy preferences of an enlarged EU.

Dr Kerry Longhurst is Senior Lecturer in European Security at the European Research Institute at the University of Birmingham, UK. She has published in the areas of German security policy, Polish foreign policy and transatlantic security.

Dr Marcin Zaborowski is a Lecturer in European Politics at Aston University in the UK and is currently seconded as a Senior Research Fellow at the European Union Institute for Security Studies in Paris. He has published widely in the areas of European and transatlantic security, and the Common Foreign and Security Policy.

'This Chatham House Paper is indispensable for all those who are either professionally or academically interested in the foreign and security policy of Poland. It combines thorough analysis and brilliant presentation with a critical evaluation of Poland - the most vocal and most self-confident new Atlanticist in the new Europe.

Kerry Longhurst and Marcin Zaborowski give a sophisticated explanation of the origins and direction of Polish Atlanticism, both in a historical context and against the background of the challenges and opportunities of EU membership.

This unique study provides a sound understanding of Poland's evolving foreign and security priorities, in both the European and the transatlantic context. In particular, the authors give a perceptive and convincing portrayal of the way in which Polish priorities are adapting to a new realm of transatlantic relations and of Poland's attempts to overcome its old dilemma: how to construct an effective new security policy "between Germany and Russia".'

Professor Adam Rotfeld, former Foreign Minister of Poland (2005)