Insiders and Outsiders in the New Europe

Edited by Julie Smith (Head, European Programme, RIIA) and Charles Jenkins (Director, Western Europe, Economist Intelligence Unit)

This edited volume assesses the likely impact of EU and Nato enlargement on relations between those central and east European states.

Up to eight central and east European states – the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia – are likely to join the European Union in 2004. Three of these states – Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic – have already joined Nato; the rest aspire to do so, as do Bulgaria and Romania. This edited volume assesses the likely impact of EU and Nato enlargement on relations between those central and east European states that are likely to join in the near future and those destined to remain outside.Up to eight central and east European states ? the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia ? are likely to join the European Union in 2004. Three of these states ? Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic ? have already joined Nato; the rest aspire to do so, as do Bulgaria and Romania. This edited volume assesses the likely impact of EU and Nato enlargement on relations between those central and east European states that are likely to join in the near future and those destined to remain outside. Looking at three thematic areas ? economic cooperation, security and defence, and free movement of people ? and six case studies, the book outlines the current relations between the states, how these relate to the past and what impact enlargement will have. Will it indeed create a new ?paper curtain? to replace the ?iron curtain? that divided Europe for forty years?