Chapter, UNA-UK Report

Rob Bailey

Resource security is now a priority for governments the world over. Government interventions in resource markets, such as biofuel mandates and export controls, often make things worse. In the medium term, climate change will create local scarcities in vital resources such as food and water, increase market instability by disrupting production and trade, and by fuelling conflict.

Residents of Sanjay camp collecting water from NDMC tank, Chanakyapuri area on 22 May 2013 in New Delhi, India. Various areas in East and South Delhi today faced water shortage as Uttar Pradesh cut raw water supply to the city from the upper Ganga canal tResidents of Sanjay camp collecting water from NDMC tank, Chanakyapuri area on 22 May 2013 in New Delhi, India. Various areas in East and South Delhi faced water shortage as Uttar Pradesh cut raw water supply to the city from the upper Ganga canal to fix a breach. Photo by Arijit Sen/Hindustan Times/Getty Images.
  • Resource security is now a priority for governments the world over. Markets for many resources are likely to remain tight and unstable as demand growth outstrips production and stocks struggle to recover. Government interventions in resource markets, such as biofuel mandates and export controls, often make things worse. In the medium term, climate change will create local scarcities in vital resources such as food and water, increase market instability by disrupting production and trade, and by fuelling conflict.
     
  • Development models must adapt to this new reality. Five priorities for doing so are outlined in this chapter: Improve governance and transparency; Get the resource prices right; Unlock financing for clean development; Manage risk and reduce vulnerability; and, Global action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
     
This chapter is taken from the United Nations Association-UK report, Global Development Goals: Leaving No One Behind, which focuses on the MDGs and the post-2015 development agenda. Read report.