Programme Paper

Sam Lawson
Teak timber logs from Myanmar sit on the dockside at the Kolkata Dock System (KDS), part of the Kolkata Port Trust (KoPT), in Kolkata, West Bengal, India 16 April 16 2014. Photo by Sanjit Das/Bloomberg/Getty Images.Teak timber logs from Myanmar sit on the dockside at the Kolkata Dock System (KDS), part of the Kolkata Port Trust (KoPT), in Kolkata, West Bengal, India 16 April 16 2014. Photo by Sanjit Das/Bloomberg/Getty Images.

Chatham House has developed a detailed methodology (termed ‘import-source analysis’) for estimating the amount of likely illegally sourced timber and wood products (including pulp and paper) imported by consumer and processing countries. This has been developed as part of a Chatham House project to assess levels of illegal logging and related trade around the world. 

The import-source analysis provides quantitative estimates of the scale and nature of imports of illegally sourced wood by key countries, and enables an assessment of how these have changed over time. In 2010 Chatham House used this approach to assess illegally sourced wood imports by five consumer countries (France, Japan, the Netherlands, United Kingdom and the United States) and two processing countries (China and Vietnam) between 2000 and 2008. Chatham House has now extended the assessment to cover two additional consumer countries (South Korea and India) and one additional processing country (Thailand). Imports to these countries were assessed for the years 2000–12. 

This paper provides background data and information used to formulate the estimates of illegally sourced wood imports for South Korea, India and Thailand. However, it is illustrative of the process used for the 2010 study.