Briefing

Arne Strand

Future stability in Afghanistan depends in part upon continued delivery of development assistance throughout the country, albeit at reduced levels, to meet basic needs. Experience demonstrates that delivery of development assistance to Afghan villages and townships is possible, though not without risks, even in a more demanding security environment.

Farmers collecting wheat seed in Helmand. Photo: SAC Neil Chapman (RAF)/MOD/DFIDFarmers collecting wheat seed in Helmand. Photo: SAC Neil Chapman (RAF)/MOD/DFID

Summary

  • Future stability in Afghanistan depends in part upon continued delivery of development assistance throughout the country, albeit at reduced levels, to meet basic needs.
     
  • Experience demonstrates that delivery of development assistance to Afghan villages and townships is possible, though not without risks, even in a more demanding security environment.
     
  • Concerns about corruption, access, monitoring and evaluation do not represent an insuperable obstacle for development assistance.
     
  • An innovative risk management and mitigation approach is needed, entailing flexibility, a high degree of donor coherence, and commitment to a medium- to long-term strategy.
     
  • Engagement with the new government including through the Tokyo Mutual Accountability Framework will be essential.