Past event

Conference

Future of Work

Policy, business models and growth in an evolving technology and skills landscape

The British Academy, London

Technological innovation is changing the world of work, and it is necessary to rethink the rules that govern labour markets and workplace skills. Advances in automation, digitization, ICT and manufacturing represent enormous opportunities for employers and employees, but require policy-makers and businesses to navigate critical challenges in the form of jobs disruption, skills development, maintaining economic competitiveness and, in the long term, adapting to profound systemic and societal changes already in progress.

Key questions include:

  • Which jobs and industries are likely to see the greatest changes, and what are the implications of this for different economies around the globe?  
  • What skills will future workers require? Where are the greatest skills gaps? What does this mean for education and training priorities across different economies, for both individuals and policy-makers, as means of encouraging job growth?  
  • What are the resulting challenges for defining employer/employee relationships, and what are the most effective regulatory regimes for managing this shift? 
  • How can traditional institutions effectively govern workplaces and workforces that transcend national borders? 
  • How are technological trends changing the way labour markets work? What are the drivers and policy implications of the emerging ‘on-demand’ and ‘gig’ economies? 

This conference will explore technological trends and how they are reshaping the future of work, forecasting key areas of job disruption and evaluating ways in which policy and business leaders can adapt regulatory and economic frameworks in response. In addition, speakers will consider whether adapting existing strategies is sufficient or if a systemic rethinking of the working world, and the rules that govern it, is required. 

In partnership with:

McKinsey Global Institute to partner with Chatham House on the Future of Work 2016 conferenc
The Chatham House Rule 
To enable as open a debate as possible, this conference will be held under the Chatham House Rule.

Twitter 
Suggested hashtag: #CHWork

Pricing

For any questions about which rate applies to you, please contact Alex Cook on
+44 (0) 20 7957 5727

                       FULL RATE
 EXCL. VATINCL. VAT
Major corporate member rates  
All organizations£595£714
Corporate member rates  
Commercial organizations£1,180£1,416
Government departments£700£840
NGOs and academics£460£552
Standard rates  
Commercial organizations£1,295£1,554 
Government departments£750£900
NGOs and academics£510

£612

Monday 27 June
0930

Session One | The Changing Landscape of Work
09:30 - 11:20 

This session will focus on current technological trends and how they are reshaping the world of work, exploring policy implications and likelihood of jobs disruption across different industries and economies. 

  • What are the technologies and trends that are changing specific roles in specific industries? What is the potential for automation in these roles, and over what timelines? 
  • How does the current wave of automation differ from previous historical examples, and what are the potential consequences of this for net job growth? 
  • Destruction or disruption – which jobs are essentially disappearing, and what new ones are being created? Is a ‘hollowing out’ of the workplace taking place?
  • To what extent will effects vary from region to region? Given advances in the automation of knowledge-based work as well as complex manufacturing, how will the economic effects differ between developed and developing countries?
  • To what degree does the automation of 'knowledge-work' differentiate current trends of automation and job disruption from historic precedents? 
  • How will automation trends across different industries affect income and employment levels and different socio-economic groups? What are the consequences of potential ‘occupational polarization’, and how can policy-makers adapt welfare strategies to mitigate its effects?  
  • To what extent will technology-driven changes in job roles affect employment and income levels differently across different genders?

Chair’s opening remarks
James Manyika, Director, McKinsey Global Institute

Ministerial address
Sango Patekile Holomisa, Deputy Minister for Labour, South Africa

Questions and discussion  

Speakers
Mustafa Suleyman, Co-founder, Google DeepMind
Lynda Gratton, Professor of Management Practice, London Business School 
Dr John Irons, Managing Director Global Markets, Rockefeller Foundation 
Michael Osborne, Co-Director, Oxford Martin Programme on Technology and Employment, University of Oxford

Questions and discussion  

11:20 – 11:50 Refreshments

Session Two | Transforming Skill Sets for Growth
11:50 - 13:30

This session will assess how the value of particular skills in the workforce is changing as a result of technology, the subsequent policy responses this requires, and how to deliver growth in employment in this context.

  • What skills will be required by workers in the future? Which industries will see the greatest changes to key skill sets, in particular given the increased automation of knowledge-based work?
  • What industries, and in turn which economies globally, will experience the most significant disruptions? How well equipped are different economies to meet future skill-set demands?
  • What is the role of government and business in fostering the development of new skills for the workplace? What are the most effective strategies for this and to what extent do varying levels of infrastructure weaken differing economies’ ability to ‘reskill’ workforces?
  • Given the emergence of ‘technological convergence’ and the ‘gig economy’, is a fundamental shift in the way labour markets work under way, and to what extent are adaptability and flexibility the most critical skills moving forward? Can these skills be acquired through traditional mediums?
  • How will changing skills requirements alter education priorities for individuals and policy-makers across the stages of formal education?
  • What are the economic implications of potential skills gaps for different age groups and genders?

Chair
Vlatka Hlupic, Professor of Business and Management, University of Westminster

Ministerial address
Torbjørn Røe Isaksen, Minister of Education and Research, Norway (on the record)  

Questions and discussion  

Speakers
Harry Elsinga, Vice President Human Resources, GE Oil & Gas
James Manyika, Director, McKinsey Global Institute
Allen Blue, Co-founder and Vice President Product Development, LinkedIn 
Sir Charlie Mayfield, Chairman, John Lewis Partnership Plc

Questions and discussion

13:30 - 14:30 Lunch   

Session Three | Technology Reshaping Employment
14:30 - 15:50 

This session will address how advances in technology are redefining employer/employee relationships, reshaping working environments globally, and transforming labour markets globally. 

  • How are ICT and technological convergence transforming working environments globally? To what extent are we seeing the breakdown of the traditional ‘nuclear office’ and a redefining of employer/employee relationships?
  • How are ICT and manufacturing advances reducing worker dependence on traditional employment structures and infrastructure?
  • How are the metrics that measure workplace productivity changing? How is this shift, along with advancements in worker surveillance and mobility, changing the nature of work and perceived work/life balances? 
  • How will these changes to both working environments and relationships impact the ability of workers to organize, lobby and express their concerns?
  • Is technological advancement changing global perceptions of work, and is it reducing the conflation of ‘work’ with ‘employment’?
  • Business without borders – how can state-level actors legislate over increasingly international businesses? Is greater cooperation between businesses internationally going to become more necessary, and what are the regulatory implications of this?

Chair
Peter Flade, Senior Advisor, Gallup

Speakers
Saj Sood, Senior Director, Strategy & Business Development, Cisco
Andrew Byrne, Head of Policy, UK, Ireland & Nordics, Uber
Clodagh O’Reilly, Workforce Science & Analytics Practice Leader EMEA, IBM Smarter Workforce 
Liam Maxwell, National Technology Advisor, HM Government​
Colin Leckey, Partner, Lewis Silkin 

Questions and discussion

15:50 – 16:20 Refreshments

Session Four | Evolving Labour Markets
16:20 - 17:40

This session will explore the effects of technological advances on labour markets, the regulatory as well as industry implications of increasingly real-time matching of labour supply to demand, and their ramifications for international economic competitiveness.

  • What are the technological drivers behind the emerging gig economy and enhanced worker flexibility overall?  What regulatory challenges will accompany this? 
  • Which industries are most likely to see the emergence of a technology enabled real-time market in labour? What are the implications of this for employers and employees? 
  • How are technological advances facilitating trends such as outsourcing, and how will these continue to affect labour markets across different economies? Which sectors are becoming increasingly less dependent on regional workforces? 
  • What are the regulatory challenges for governing internationally mobile workforces, and how can state actors cooperate to overcome them?
  • What are the implications of an increasingly technology-driven international labour market? 
  • What is the current status of labour market liquidity and elasticity? How will technological advancements continue to affect this?

Chair
Lesley Giles, Deputy Director, UK Commission for Employment and Skills

Ministerial Address
Thorben Albrecht, Permanent State Secretary, Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs, Germany (on the record)

Questions and discussion

Moderated discussion

Speakers
Harry Elsinga, Vice President Human Resources, GE Oil & Gas
Stefano Scarpetta, Director for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs, OECD
Clodagh O’Reilly, Workforce Science & Analytics Practice Leader EMEA, IBM Smarter Workforce ​

Questions and discussion 

 1740 End of conference and reception sponsored by McKinsey Global Institute


© The Royal Institute of International Affairs 2016

Speakers

Thorben Albrecht to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Thorben Albrecht

Permanent State Secretary, Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs, Germany

Allen Blue to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Allen Blue

Co-Founder and VP Product Management, LinkedIn

Andrew Byrne to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Andrew Byrne

Head of Policy, UK, Ireland & Nordics, Uber

Harry Elsinga to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Harry Elsinga

Vice President, Human Resources, GE Oil & Gas

Peter Flade to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Peter Flade

Senior Advisor, Gallup

Lesley Giles to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Lesley Giles

Deputy Director, UK Commission for Employment and Skills

Lynda Gratton to speak at Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Lynda Gratton

Professor of Management Practice, London Business School

Vlatka Hlupic to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Vlatka Hlupic

Professor of Business and Management, University of Westminster

Inkosi Patekile Holomisa to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Sango Patekile Holomisa

Deputy Minister for Labour, South Africa

John Irons to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Dr John Irons

Managing Director Global Markets, Rockefeller Foundation

Torbjørn Røe Isaksen to speak at Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Torbjørn Røe Isaksen

Minister of Education and Research, Norway

Colin Leckey to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Colin Leckey

Partner, Lewis Silkin

James Manyika to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

James Manyika

Director, McKinsey Global Institute

Liam Maxwell to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Liam Maxwell

National Technology Advisor, HM Government

Sir Charlie Mayfield to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Sir Charlie Mayfield

Chairman, John Lewis Partnership; Chairman of the UK Commission for Employment

Clodagh O'Reilly to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Clodagh O'Reilly

Workforce Science & Analytics Practice Leader, EMEA, IBM Smarter Workforce

Michael Osborne to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Michael Osborne

Co-Director, Oxford Martin Programme on Technology and Employment, University of Oxford

Stefano Scarpetta to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Stefano Scarpetta

Director for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs, OECD

Saj Sood to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Saj Sood

Senior Director, Strategy and Business Development, EMEAR, Cisco

Mustafa Suleyman to speak at the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

Mustafa Suleyman

Co-founder, Google DeepMind

Cisco to sponsor the Chatham House Future of Work conference

GE to sponsor the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference 

Lewis Silkin to sponsor the Chatham House Future of Work 2016 conference

If you are interested in becoming a sponsor for this event, please contact
Ben Cumming on +44 (0) 20 7957 5729

Enviable Workplace to partner with Chatham House on the Future of Work 2016 conference

Future of Work Hub to partner with Chatham House on the Future of Work 2016 conference

Hot Spots Movement to partner with Chatham House on the Future of Work 2016 conference

International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) to partner with Chatham House on the Global Trade 2016 conference

International HR Advisor to partner with Chatham House on the Future of Work 2016 conference

London HR Connection to partner with Chatham House on the Future of Work 2016 conference

Oxford Strategic Consulting to partner with Chatham House on the Future of Work conference

WorkLife Hub to partner with Chatham House on the Future of Work 2016 conference

 

The Work Foundation to partner with Chatham House on the Future of Work conference

If you are interested in becoming a media partner for this event, please contact
Amy Smith on +44 (0)20 7957 5755

Venue

The British Academy
10-11 Carlton House Terrace
London
SW1Y 5AH 

Map

[email protected]

Due to refurbishment works at Chatham House in the summer, please note that this conference will not be held at Chatham House and will take place at the above venue.

Accommodation
Although we cannot book accommodation for delegates, we have arranged a reduced rate at the hotels below, where you can book your own accommodation. Please inform the hotel that you will be attending a conference at Chatham House (The Royal Institute of International Affairs) to qualify for the Institute's reduced rate.

Please note all rates are subject to availability and that these hotels are situated near Chatham House rather than the conference venue.

Flemings Mayfair
Half Moon Street
Mayfair
London - W1J 7BH

Tel: + 44 (0)20 7499 2964
Fax: + 44 (0)20 7499 1817

Standard Single from £195 + VAT

The Cavendish London
81 Jermyn Street
London - SW1Y 6JF

Tel: + 44 (0)20 7930 2111
Fax: + 44 (0)20 7839 2125

Standard Single £205 + VAT

Book The Cavendish online

The Stafford London 
St James's Place
London - SW1A 1NJ

Tel: 020 7518 1125
Fax: 020 7493 7121

Standard Single £235 +VAT

The Savoy London
Strand
London - WC2R 0EU

Tel: 020 7836 4343
Fax: 020 7240 6040 

Standard Single from £250 +VAT

This conference will be held under the Chatham House Rule. Information for journalists.

Press can request a press pass.