An employee removes bread from the oven at a bakery in the Sudanese capital,
Khartoum, on 24 May 2019. Photo credit: Copyright © Ashraf Shazly/Contributor/Getty Images.
An employee removes bread from the oven at a bakery in the Sudanese capital, Khartoum, on 24 May 2019. Photo credit: Copyright © Ashraf Shazly/Contributor/Getty Images.
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About the Sudan Stakeholder Dialogues series

The Chatham House Africa Programme designed the Sudan Stakeholder Dialogues series to help identify the factors that have led to the current economic crisis, the immediate steps that need to be taken to avert collapse and stabilize the economy, and the longer-term structural reforms required to set Sudan on the path to recovery. The project is funded by Humanity United.

Three private roundtable meetings were convened in the first quarter of 2019, with the aim of generating informed and constructive new thinking on policy options and reforms that could help Sudan build a more economically prosperous, stable and inclusive nation. The Sudan Stakeholder Dialogues series was held under the Chatham House Rule.1

From the outset, the project sought to offer a neutral space for discussion to policymakers and influencers from a broad range of backgrounds: Sudanese government officials, opposition figures, economists, experts on Sudan’s political economy and governance, civil society figures, representatives of international financial institutions, and other international policymakers. The Chatham House Africa Programme would like to thank all participants for their valuable insights and contributions to this project.

This paper draws together the key themes and findings from each of the three roundtables, ranging from broad structural economic issues to sector-specific priority interventions. It presents options and recommendations for Sudanese leaders, including the transitional government, in support of building a more economically prosperous, peaceful and inclusive nation.

1 When a meeting, or part thereof, is held under the Chatham House Rule, participants are free to use the information received, but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the speaker(s), nor that of any other participant, may be revealed.