Anas Aremeyaw Anas

The masked Ghanaian journalist tells Agnes Frimston that his uniquely risky ways of fighting crime and corruption are gaining ground across Africa

The World Today
4 minute READ

Agnes Frimston

Deputy Editor, The World Today

How did you first get into investigative journalism?

I started about 17 or 18 years ago when I came out of journalism school. I am a product of my society, so investigative journalism came to me as a natural consequence of what was happening in society. If you are a normal reporter, they put you into a newsroom, and you realize that you’ve been reporting for three months and nothing has happened.

So I asked myself, how can I apply myself as a journalist whose work would stand the test of time and create positive changes within my society?

What results of your work are you most proud of?

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