International Affairs has compiled free, online-only issues comprising articles from the archive - spanning more than eight decades - on specialist subjects.

World development and world government in International Affairs

Ahead of the November issue of International Affairs, which will look at various aspects of the United Nations and global governance to mark the UN’s 70th anniversary, the journal has worked with Giovanni Farese, managing editor of The Journal of European Economic History, to compile a virtual issue on what he calls ‘the rise of the dual culture of world development and world government’ in international relations. The virtual issue consists of a selection of articles published in International Affairs between 1930 and 1950. In the journal’s early decades, most articles stemmed from speeches given at Chatham House. The virtual issue is hence a cavalcade of prominent persons—scholars (among them E. H. Carr), diplomats, policy-makers, lawyers, bankers—who came to speak at Chatham House to offer their views on world order and burgeoning ideas on world government and development.

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The virtual issue includes:

 

UK defence policy

With a newly elected Conservative government now in office, work in Westminster and Whitehall on the successor to the 2010 Strategic Defence and Security Review has begun in earnest.The challenges for policy-makers will be no less daunting than they have been in previous post-1945 reviews.The United Kingdom’s structural current account remains in deficit and will not be cleared until 2017–18 if the government manages to adhere to its manifesto pledge.Yet the new government is committed to maintaining a regular army of 82,000, retention of a continuous at sea nuclear deterrent through the acquisition of four replacement submarines, long-term funding of the Ministry of Defence’s Equipment Plan to 2024 at 1 per cent above inflation, and bringing both Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers into service. The challenge for senior officials and the government’s new defence and security team is therefore to find a strategically coherent and affordable way that balances defence commitments and resources in the 2015 SDSR. In doing so, they will inevitably look to the past in formulating new answers to perennial dilemmas in national defence and security policy. With the notion of learning from the past in mind, this virtual issue contains 15 articles drawn from the International Affairs archive that provide insights into key aspects of British defence and security policy as well as an introductory article assessing IA's contribution to the postwar UK defence and security debate. The articles included in this virtual edition represent a fraction of the much larger body of scholarly contributions to British defence and security policy analysis and debate in the journal since the first decade after the Second World War.

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Includes:

  • International Affairs and the British defence and security policy debate: the bibliometric context, Andrew M. Dorman and Matthew R. H. Uttley
  • Britain's changing strategic position, Noble Frankland, October 1957
  • 'Greenwoodery', John Baylis, Summer 1986
  • Blair's wars and Brown's budgets: from Strategic Defence Review to strategic decay in less than a decade, Paul Cornish and Andrew Dorman, March 2009
  • The limited capacity of management to rescue UK defence policy: a review and a word of caution, Trevor Taylor, March 2012
  • British defence choices beyond 'Options for Change', Philip A. G. Sabin, April 1993
  • Labour's Strategic Defence Review, Colin McInnes, October 1998
  • National defence in the age of austerity, Paul Cornish and Andrew Dorman, July 2009
  • Breaking the mould: the United Kingdom Strategic Defence Review 2010, Paul Cornish and Andrew M. Dorman, March 2010
  • Complexity, strategy and the national interest, Timothy Edmunds, May 2014
  • The military covenant and the civil-military contract in Britain, Helen McCartney, March 2010
  • British civil-military relations and the problem of risk, Timothy Edmunds, March 2012
  • British judicial engagement and the juridification of the armed forces, Anthony Forster, March 2012
  • The place of the bomber in British policy, John Slessor, July 1953
  • Does my bomb look big in this? Britain's nuclear choices after Trident, Michael Clarke, January 2004
  • More than a storm in a teacup: the defence and security implications of Scottish independence, Andrew Dorman, May 2014

International relations in the interwar era

Earlier this year International Affairs published a special issue on the Great War (90: 2, 2014). We have now assembled a cluster of four articles from the IA archives that from different perspectives look at the post-First World War world. All four were originally speeches given at Chatham House, then edited into articles for the journal. In a 1923 article, Philip Kerr analyses the United States’ view of the Great War and the European and international political situation, and asks how the US should best deal with the aftermath of the war. Speaking in 1929, Dr Arnold Wolfers addresses questions about  Germany's postwar foreign policy: a ‘United States of Europe’ would be the best thing, he says, and ‘the backbone of European peace is Franco-German friendship’. In March 1930 General Jan Smuts (later Prime Minister of South Africa) describes how, in his view, the transformed British Empire post-First World War was proof that peace among the world’s people was possible and that the League of Nations would  succeed. From his perspective in South Africa, Smuts also considers the lessons learned from the period after the Boer War, comparing those to the challenges confronting a Europe in postwar recovery. Finally, in E. H. Carr’s first address as Woodrow Wilson Chair of International Politics (at Aberystwyth University), published in IA in November 1936, he considers how British public opinion after the First World War could act as a safeguard for peace. Describing public opinion as ‘anti-Versailles’, Carr makes the case that ‘if the situation had been more wisely handled in 1919 …  a second world war between Great Britain and Germany, or between France and Germany, might have become unthinkable.’

Includes: 

  • The political situation in the United States, Philip Kerr, July 1923
  • The British Empire and World Peace, J. C. Smuts, March, 1930
  • Germany and Europe, Dr. Arnold Wolfers, January, 1930
  • Public opinion as a safeguard of peace, E. H. Carr, November - December, 1936 

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The Middle East

Includes:

  • Economic and Social Foundations of Democracy in the Middle East, Charles Issawi, January 1956
  • Britain and the Arabs: The Need for a New Start, Arnold Toynbee, October 1964
  • The Gulf War and its Aftermath: First Reflections, Fred Halliday, April 1991

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The UK and Europe

Includes:

  • Great Britain as a European Power, Austen Chamberlain, March 1930
  • Britain in Europe: the Impact on Foreign Policy, Kenneth Younger, October 1972
  • Footfalls Echoing in the Memory. Britain and Europe: the Historical Perspective, Vernon Bogdanor, July 2005

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Falklands Dispute

Includes:

  • Bridgehead Revisited: the Literature of the Falklands, Lawrence Freedman, Summer 1983
  • The Future of the Falkland Islands: a Solution made in Hong Kong?, Peter J. Beck, Autumn 1985
  • Towards Rapprochement? Anglo-Argentine Relations and the Falklands/Malvinas in the Late 1990s, Klaus Dodds, July 1998

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Russia

Includes:

  • Impressions of the Situation in Soviet Russia, Herbert Morrison, January 1934
  • The Soviet World Faces West: 1945–1970, Walter C. Clemens, Jr., July 1970
  • The Secret Policemen's Ball: the United States, Russia and the International Order after 11 September, Anatol Lieven, April 2002

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The Global Approach to Nuclear Weapons

Includes:

  • Double-talk of Double-think? A Comment on the Draft Non-Proliferation Treaty, David Vital, 1968
  • The End of the NPT Regime?, Joseph F Pilat, 2007
  • Rethinking the NPT's Role in Security: 2010 and Beyond, Rebecca Johnson, 2010

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Contact

For more information please contact International Affairs book reviews editor Krisztina Csortea.