13 February 2018

This paper brings together a summary of the discussions at the fifth and final event in the UK–Japan Global Seminar series, with an essay by Sir David Warren on the UK–Japan relationship in an age of populism.

Authors

Sir David Warren

Associate Fellow, Asia-Pacific Programme

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Pro-EU demonstrators fly a Union flag and an EU flag outside of the Houses of Parliament in Westminster, central London, on 8 December 2017. Photo: DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images.
Pro-EU demonstrators fly a Union flag and an EU flag outside of the Houses of Parliament in Westminster, central London, on 8 December 2017. Photo: Getty Images.

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The fifth and final event in the UK–Japan Global Seminar series was held at Chatham House in London on 18–19 September 2017, with the title ‘Anglo-Japanese Cooperation in an Era of Growing Nationalism and Weakening Globalization’. It considered UK and Japanese approaches to the risks and opportunities – political and economic – facing Asia and Europe. Topics included Britain and Japan’s respective bilateral relations with the US under President Donald Trump; economic opportunities for Anglo-Japanese cooperation during a potential period of deglobalization; China’s future as a geoeconomic actor; and the impact of populism, including potential limits to regionalism, in both Asia and the West.

This publication brings together a summary of the discussions at the seminar, with an essay by Sir David Warren that draws upon some of the conference themes to discuss the UK–Japan relationship in an age of populism.

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